Posts Tagged ‘Test’

As water cooling has evolved over the past few years the quality and performance of kits has seen a similar progression and development.  Today you can spend anywhere from $80-$500 on a water cooling kit.  Up to this point my reviews have all been individual parts based.  I have never before attempted doing any sort of kit review and wanted to try.  I very much appreciate a good value and wanted to review beyond your typical unboxing or screenshot level of testing and understand the finer details of how kits compare at a more scientific level.  My first round of kits is focused on “Under $150″ and ” 2 x 120mm (240) radiator” as I feel to really see worthwhile silent water cooling benefits a  240 radiator is needed and I also wanted to keep in tune with the value concept and 100-150 seems like a good price point to start with.

Kit reviews shall begin!!

Before going too far, I would like to thank my Sponsors:

frozencpu_logo

I would like to thank Mark from FrozenCPU.com for sponsoring the XSPC and Larkooler kits.

Swiftech_logo_white_backgrounds

I would also like to thank Gabe from Swiftech for sponsoring the H220 kit.

150DollarKitTesting

I am also looking to expand and include some sealed kits such as the Corsair H100i, Thermaltake Water 2.0, and other sealed AIO systems, but I haven’t found sponsors for those yet.  The H220 does come filled and more plug and play, but all three kits are all easy enough to take apart and expand from a removable parts perspective.

COST COMPARISON

Larkooler BA2-241 – $129.95

Swiftech H220 – $139.95

XSPC Raystorm,750,RS240 – $144.95

So these kits are all under the $150 criteria and have 240mm radiators so they should be similar in terms of case compatibility being able to fit a 240mm sized radiator.  So, here we go…an adventure in kit testing for those looking to spend under $150.

GENERAL TESTING STRATEGY

I’m looking for feedback on testing requests before I am done.  So far I have developed the following general strategy:

  • Phase 1 Kit Core vs Noise level (Core vs dbA) – Basic Kit testing with the kit fans focusing on what you get from the box and attempting to measure noise levels in both a qualitative and quantitative means.
  • Phase 2 Kit + Fan Mod (Core vs RPM) – Testing each kit with the same fans.
  • Phase 3 Expansion (Remaining Pump Power PSI vs GPM) – Breaking down each kit to test the remaining pump power including the kit.  This will be done via pressure manometer and flow meter to understand exactly how much pumping power remains to push through additional components
  • Phase 4 Expansion CPU + GPU test (GPU Core vs RPM) – While I don’t yet have a  sponsor or a block for my (currently air-cooled) 570GTX, I may do a test with CPU & GPU put in the same loop as a thermal expansion test. I could see a lot of people wanting to add a GPU block to the system and I want to see how well they can handle that and do some GPU testing as part of the kit review.  I will keep trying and see if I can find some support for this latter test.
  • Phase 5 Mods – Possibly look at what happens if you expand the radiator or better understanding what parts should be upgraded for future expansion.

If you have any testing wishes or suggestions, please let me know.  I am just getting started on these and plan to spend some quality time.  The H220 showed up first at my door, so it’s going to be first in line.  I will be focusing on Phase 1 in the near term.

THE CASE (XSPC H2 Tower)

I have two platforms, my Danger Den Torture Rack open test bench and my XSPC H2 Tower case I reviewed here.  While I could test the kits on the open torture rack, I wanted to simulate an actual enclosed case test condition including some grill restriction to simulate the air flow restriction and to also help evaluate the installation in a case condition.  I also wanted to the the kit radiators in a top mounted setup which is probably how most of these will test out.  Finally, I wanted something large enough that could be expanded for larger kit testing down the road or modified testing where you add a second radiator to the existing kit.  The H2 is massive in size and arguably overkill, but the grill in the top and 15mm fan spacing screw holes should make mounting the kit radiators very simple and easy to install.  There will be no case modding needed to fit any watercooling kit so it makes for a good 240/360/480 kit test case as well.

This case was sponsored by XSPC some time ago, a special thanks to Paul from XSPC for the sample.

XSPClogo

XSPC-H2-28

More to come…

Cheers!Smilieparty0012
Martin

Welcome to my review of the revision 4,  XSPC X2O 750.  While I did test a similar submerged acrylic version of this pump many years ago here, this pump and reservoir has been revised several times since then including a brand new impeller, ceramic shaft, ceramic sleeve, a more stable magnetic field, and improved electronic components.  It is also a pump that is very popular due to XSPC’s amazing 750 kit price, so I was interested in checking out the latest revision and see how it does with all the upgrades and revisions.  So off to the test bench to evaluate full hydraulics and some video recording to share some noise recordings with you.

A special thanks to Paul from XSPC for providing the review sample:

XSPC-X2O-750-01

Manufacturer Specifications:

http://www.xs-pc.com/products/pumps/x2o-750-dual-bayrespump-black-v4/

After nearly a year of development we are proud to release the latest version of our X2O 750 pump, the V4.

The acrylic reservoir has been replaced by a tough nylon reservoir with four brass M3 threads on each side. On the front of the reservoir the viewing window now sits flush with the beautifully finished, brushed aluminium faceplate, and the screws are now black to match the faceplate.

On the back of the reservoir we have added a spare G1/4″ port which can be used for a temperature sensor, or draining the system. We have also added a better the LED holder and improved the fill cap seal with a high quality thick o-ring.

The improvements are not just on the outside. We have fully overhauled the 750 pump with a new impeller, ceramic shaft, ceramic sleeve, a more stable magnetic field, and improved electronic components. These changes improve performance, improve reliability, reduce noise, and increase the lifespan of the pump.

Our most popular water pump just got even better!

– Pump Performance: 750 lph
– Head Delivery: 1.8m
– Low Noise, Low Vibration (42dB Max)
– Voltage: 12V (4pin molex)
– Tough Nylon Reservoir
– Dimensions: 149 x 86.5 x 103 mm
– Brushed Aluminium Faceplate
– Brass Screw Threads
– G1/4″ Threads
– Individually Pressure Tested
– 1x 5mm LED Hole
– Capacity 625ml

Maximum water temperature: 50C

Supplied with black faceplate, 8x M3,4mm screws, G1/4″ Plug, and blue LED.

XSPC-X2O-750-02

So besides the all new tough nylon housing, the pump has really been overhauled with a new impeller, bearing, and electronics…very good!

Welcome to my review of a brand new single bay reservoir pump, the XSPC X2O 500.

While I have had the opportunity to test many 20 watt+ bay reservoir pumps such as the XSPC D5 Bayres I tested here.  I know from experiments such as this flow sensitivity test on the Raystorm, that CPU blocks are very resilient to operating well at very low flow rates and in custom loops we generally have much more pump than really needed.  That is fine when space and cost are not high priorities, but there is a bit of a gap in pump options that are more value oriented and still have expansion and power capabilities beyond that of a CPU only loop pump. Most of the all in one kit pumps designed for CPU cooling only have pumps in the 1-2 watt range of power, but they are really maxed out and often can’t push flow much beyond about 0.5GPM. That’s where the X2O 500 fits into the picture, targeted for those that don’t have a budget or want to spend over $100 or more on pumping power, but they want something that is still expandable and capable of powering through multiple block and radiator systems as they upgrade.

A special thanks to Paul from XSPC for providing the review sample:

XSPC-X2O-500-01

Specifications:

Since it is not yet listed on their website, I’ll just note some specifications that I can come up with on my own.

  • G1/4″ Threads
  • Brushed Aluminium Faceplate
  • Acrylic Reservoir
  • 1x 5mm LED hole
  • Blue Sleeved LED provided
  • Dimensions: 149 x 99 x 42mm
  • 5 screws

Ever since doing pump top testing for the DDC series pumps, there was always some thought that gains from the DDC tops was larger in part (vs D5 tops) due to the sharp and small elbow at the pump inlet in the factory top that is removed.  In addition, past testing of aftermarket tops with alternate inlets also showed some rather large losses when using those alternate elbow inlets.   Which brings me to this fairly simple test of a single DDC pump + top using Bitspower 90 degree elbows and straight barbs as the variable.

While I didn’t request a sponsor specifically for this test, I did use some parts sponsored from a long time ago. The top was provide by XSPC many years ago.  This is the king of DDC pump tops that I tested back here in 2008. I have tested other newer tops and have yet to find one that outperforms it on a like DDC motor.  It has a fairly typical thicker top with a reduced inlet opening so I figured it represents the DDC tops out there fairly well.

XSPClogo

Bitspower also sent me the elbows many moons ago when these handy little swivel elbows first came to market.  They have the same quality barb and have a larger 10mm or so.  The internal transition is not quite a smooth radius, but it’s a fairly large diameter which makes a big difference.  These elbows are exceptionally nice and easy to use with the swivel feature.

LogoBitspower

So, the mission of this test, do modern 90 degree elbows like the larger 10mm ID bistpower swivel 90s create a significant loss on pumps when installed directly on the pump top itself?

We shall see…

Test Setup

The obligatory test setup picture, below is during the straight in and straight out configuration:

PUmpElbowTesting

I am using:

  • Mastech HY3005D DC power supply to regulate voltage
  • Cen-tech P98674 Digital multimeter to read molex plug voltage
  • Crystalfontz CFA-633 + WinTest B1.9 to monitor and smooth RPM
  • Dwyer 477-5 Digital Manometer to read Pressure Differential across the pump
  • King 7520 (Valved) to measure flow rate and adjust restriction

The large reservoir bleeds out the loop almost instantly, I simply swapped out the barbs for elbows in the other conditions.

Detailed Test Results

Straight In and Straight Out

PumpElbowImpacts-SISO

Elbow In and Straight Out

PumpElbowImpacts-EISO

Straight In & Elbow Out

PumpElbowImpacts-SIEO

Comparison

PumpElbowImpacts-Comp

That’s not quite what I expected.  I had expected the inlet side to be the bigger loss than the outlet AND I expected the losses to be much larger than that.  While you can see upwards of a 30-40% pressure loss at 1.5GPM using aftermarket pump top alternate inlets with their tiny little drilled passageways and close proximity to the impeller, the larger ID bitspower 90 degree elbows and more distant proximity is not affecting pump performance very much at all on this particular pump top.  I think the reduced diameter inlet built into the top probably straightens out the flow pretty well and we are mostly just measuring restriction added.  Some of the DDC tops such as the MCP35X likely have more impact, but there isn’t much showing when the inlet has a step down diameter after the elbow.

In an earlier elbow testing experiment here on blocks, I found this same elbow to have roughly .15PSI loss at 1.5GPM and in this test I’m getting around .1-.2PSI loss depeding on the location, so pretty close.

ElbowLosses

That data is fairly good for this discussion as well, so for those that like speaking in “Degrees”, adding an elbow to your pump inlet or outlet is about equivalent to a 0.05C temperature loss.  Probably not something to worry about much.

So, that’s that.  While I used to be a skeptic about installation of elbows on pumps, I’m not so worried about it now. At least with your typical DDC top with reduced inlet opening, the larger ID Bitspower elbows do not seem to cause much more than a little restriction which is not going to add up to more than a tenth of a degree and really not worth worrying about.

Cheers!Smilieparty0012
Martin

XSPC D5 Dual Bay Reservoir Combo

Posted: December 6, 2012 in Pumps
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

This is review of the XSPC D5 Dual Bay Reservoir Combo. This is another “Durable” option in the bay reservoir pump craze. While XPSC has had a few acrylic options, this is an all new D5 model molded with a tough nylon material that is internally accessible for cleaning via one large top cover and it has a small acrylic window. Up until this reservoir option came out though, getting your hands on a more durable material option usually meant spending over $100, but not so here…it’s about half that. Any while most reservoir tops for the D5 so far have only made very minor improvements. This bay reservoir hit several notes in performance due maintaining a nice spiral shaped volute, removing much of the exit elbow, and improving the inlet port to a more desirable size.

A special thanks to Paul from XSPC for providing the review sample:

XSPC-DualBayD5Res-01

Manufacturer Specifications:

http://www.xs-pc.com/products/pumps/d5-dual-bay-reservoirpump-combo/

– G1/4″ Threads
– Brushed Aluminium Faceplate
– Tough Nylon Body
– 1x 5mm LED hole
– Individually Pressure Tested
– Capacity 300ml
– Dimensions: 149 x 85.6 x 105mm

Supplied with black faceplate, 8 screws, and blue LED.