Posts Tagged ‘Review’

Ever since doing pump top testing for the DDC series pumps, there was always some thought that gains from the DDC tops was larger in part (vs D5 tops) due to the sharp and small elbow at the pump inlet in the factory top that is removed.  In addition, past testing of aftermarket tops with alternate inlets also showed some rather large losses when using those alternate elbow inlets.   Which brings me to this fairly simple test of a single DDC pump + top using Bitspower 90 degree elbows and straight barbs as the variable.

While I didn’t request a sponsor specifically for this test, I did use some parts sponsored from a long time ago. The top was provide by XSPC many years ago.  This is the king of DDC pump tops that I tested back here in 2008. I have tested other newer tops and have yet to find one that outperforms it on a like DDC motor.  It has a fairly typical thicker top with a reduced inlet opening so I figured it represents the DDC tops out there fairly well.

XSPClogo

Bitspower also sent me the elbows many moons ago when these handy little swivel elbows first came to market.  They have the same quality barb and have a larger 10mm or so.  The internal transition is not quite a smooth radius, but it’s a fairly large diameter which makes a big difference.  These elbows are exceptionally nice and easy to use with the swivel feature.

LogoBitspower

So, the mission of this test, do modern 90 degree elbows like the larger 10mm ID bistpower swivel 90s create a significant loss on pumps when installed directly on the pump top itself?

We shall see…

Test Setup

The obligatory test setup picture, below is during the straight in and straight out configuration:

PUmpElbowTesting

I am using:

  • Mastech HY3005D DC power supply to regulate voltage
  • Cen-tech P98674 Digital multimeter to read molex plug voltage
  • Crystalfontz CFA-633 + WinTest B1.9 to monitor and smooth RPM
  • Dwyer 477-5 Digital Manometer to read Pressure Differential across the pump
  • King 7520 (Valved) to measure flow rate and adjust restriction

The large reservoir bleeds out the loop almost instantly, I simply swapped out the barbs for elbows in the other conditions.

Detailed Test Results

Straight In and Straight Out

PumpElbowImpacts-SISO

Elbow In and Straight Out

PumpElbowImpacts-EISO

Straight In & Elbow Out

PumpElbowImpacts-SIEO

Comparison

PumpElbowImpacts-Comp

That’s not quite what I expected.  I had expected the inlet side to be the bigger loss than the outlet AND I expected the losses to be much larger than that.  While you can see upwards of a 30-40% pressure loss at 1.5GPM using aftermarket pump top alternate inlets with their tiny little drilled passageways and close proximity to the impeller, the larger ID bitspower 90 degree elbows and more distant proximity is not affecting pump performance very much at all on this particular pump top.  I think the reduced diameter inlet built into the top probably straightens out the flow pretty well and we are mostly just measuring restriction added.  Some of the DDC tops such as the MCP35X likely have more impact, but there isn’t much showing when the inlet has a step down diameter after the elbow.

In an earlier elbow testing experiment here on blocks, I found this same elbow to have roughly .15PSI loss at 1.5GPM and in this test I’m getting around .1-.2PSI loss depeding on the location, so pretty close.

ElbowLosses

That data is fairly good for this discussion as well, so for those that like speaking in “Degrees”, adding an elbow to your pump inlet or outlet is about equivalent to a 0.05C temperature loss.  Probably not something to worry about much.

So, that’s that.  While I used to be a skeptic about installation of elbows on pumps, I’m not so worried about it now. At least with your typical DDC top with reduced inlet opening, the larger ID Bitspower elbows do not seem to cause much more than a little restriction which is not going to add up to more than a tenth of a degree and really not worth worrying about.

Cheers!Smilieparty0012
Martin

Welcome to my “living” review/preview of the Swiftech MCP 655-PWM DRIVE. What do you get when you couple our most reliable, most silent, and most cool running pump with PWM technology?

A Swiftech MCP 655 PWM-DRIVE!

I have been using D5 variants for about 5 years now and have always admired them as probably being the most tried and true pump out there serving many systems for 5 years + and going strong.

Swiftech-MCP-655-PWM-Drive0

However, I have also recently come to admire having PWM control over pumps such as the Swiftech MCP-35X in which I was able to automatically speed up and slow down the pump to meet thermal demands. PWM is also of value for special reservoir tops and other cramped installations where manually getting to the pump speed control is difficult after installation.

With the added PWM features, you no longer need to touch the pump physically to change speeds and you now have the flexibility to control it manually or automatically through a variety of PWM controlling software.

A special thanks to Mark from Frozen CPU for sponsoring the pump used in this review.

frozencpu_logo

Manufacturer Description & Specifications

http://www.frozencpu.com/products/17549/ex-pmp-214/Swiftech_MCP655-PWM_12v_Water_Pump_Module_-_PWM_Enabled_Single_Version.html

In response to the overwhelming demand and popularity of the MCP655 Series FrozenCPU.com has worked with Swiftech to bring you a more versatile version. Want your pump to run as quiet as possible? Now you can have that as well as the available power of the MCP655 in the all new MCP655-PWM. That is right, a PWM version on the MCP655!!

The MCP655 pump is a high reliability, high pressure industrial pump, featuring a 50,000 hour MTBF (5 year lifetime). Such reliability is afforded by the unique design of this pump, which contains only one moving part: the magnetically driven spherical impeller spins on a single ceramic bearing, thus extending the life of this pump beyond existing standards.

The pump is completely plug-and-play, and connects directly to any computer power-supply through standard 4 pin power connectors and a PWM 4-Pin header. It’s compact design, quiet and powerful motor make it ideally suited for heavy duty cooling in environments where space is at a premium.

This pump comes stock without any housing allowing you to integrate any of your favorite pump tops and pump accessories.

  • 50,000 hours MTBF (Mean Time Between Failure) equivalent to 5 years lifetime
  • Superior 12 Volts DC convenience: plugs into the computer power supply
  • The MCP655-PWM can be used with full confidence in any MP servers, and high-end workstations
  • Superior real world performance versus any aquarium pump we have tested to this date
  • The high pressure capability of the MCP655-PWM is particularly well adapted to high-flow systems using 1/2″ ID or 3/8″ ID Tubing
  • Compact Design
  • No maintenance when used with de-mineralized water, and anti-fungal additives (Swiftech HydrX additive is recommended)
Nominal voltage: 12 V DC
Operating voltage range: 8 to 24 VDC
Nominal power (@ 12 V): 37 W Max
Nominal current (@ 12 V): 2 amps
Motor type: Brushless, microprocessor controlled
Maximum head: 13 ft (4 m)
Maximum discharge: ~ 317 GPH (1200 LPH)
Performance will vary based on housing used

So, the hydraulic specs appear to be the same as the MCP 655, however there are some minor differences in the nominal power rating of 37W and operating voltage. The 13ft of maximum head is right in line with what I have measured myself with other D5 variants, but power consumption for my test bench has typically toped out around 21 watts or so depending on restriction.

We’ll have to put it through the ringer of tests and see how it compares. Perhaps there are some differences in RPM scaling over the vario model and perhaps the PWM feature allows a greater range of RPM operation.

XSPC EX360 Radiator

Posted: December 22, 2012 in Radiators
Tags: , , ,

This is an old test I had never finished publishing, the XPSC EX360 radiator. The EX360 is XSPC’s slim thickness extreme radiator designed for top performance with slow to medium speed fans. While the RX360 is a proven top performer, not everyone has the space or budget for the higher cost RX series. The RS360 is also a good all around radiator, however in an effort to improve performance, a different type of construction was implemented to produce the EX line.

A special thanks to XSPC for providing the review sample:

Manufacturer Specifications:

http://www.xs-pc.com/products/radiators/ex-series-radiators/ex360-triple-fan-radiator/

Koolance PMP-500 Pump

Posted: December 13, 2012 in Pumps
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Welcome to my review of the Koolance PMP-500, a new monster pump from Koolance with really impressive pressure specs.    I was instantly interested in getting my grubby little hands on one of these ever since I saw it come out just a couple of months ago.  Pumps and hydraulics has always been more fun for me than thermal testing, so I was naturally interested in this new beast of a pump.  While we do already have several great options, the competition between pumps is somewhat limited compared to other water-cooling products.  This one per the specs looks very interesting, so the question is, how does it size up in terms of size, pumping power, cost, and noise relative the other popular options like the PMP-450.

A special thanks to Tim from Koolance for sponsoring the parts used in this review.

KoolancePMP500-01

Manufacturer Description & Specifications

The Koolance PMP-500 offers a high flow rate and very high static head pressure at just 12V. A mounting bracket is included.

  • Maximum Flow Rate: 16L/min (4.2 gal/min)
  • Maximum Head Pressure: 7.5m (24.6ft)
  • Motor: Brushless DC
  • Power Consumption (at max): 32W
  • Voltage Range: 6 to 12 VDC
  • Maximum Temperature: 60°C (140°F)
  • Electrical Connector: 3-pin fan header with tachometer speed signal
  • Hose Connections: G 1/4 BSP Threads
  • Noise: Less than 50dBA
  • Weight: 454g (1lbs)

Please note, the CTR-SPD12X2 and TMS-205 are unable to support this pump due to power constraints. For compatible speed control theCTR-SPD1224 is available.

General
Weight 1.20 lb (0.54 kg)
Dimensions 2.80 x 2.40 x 2.40 in (7.11 x 6.10 x 6.10 cm)
Pumps
Max Flow Rate 16L/min (4.2GPM)
Max Power 32W
Max Static Head 7.5m (24.6ft)
Max Temperature 60°C (140°F)
Native Hose Connection G 1/4 BSP Threads
Speed Knob
Tachometer yes
Type Magnetic Centrifugal
Voltage 6-12 VDC

So, the specs are mighty impressive for sure in terms of pressure head.

XSPC D5 Dual Bay Reservoir Combo

Posted: December 6, 2012 in Pumps
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This is review of the XSPC D5 Dual Bay Reservoir Combo. This is another “Durable” option in the bay reservoir pump craze. While XPSC has had a few acrylic options, this is an all new D5 model molded with a tough nylon material that is internally accessible for cleaning via one large top cover and it has a small acrylic window. Up until this reservoir option came out though, getting your hands on a more durable material option usually meant spending over $100, but not so here…it’s about half that. Any while most reservoir tops for the D5 so far have only made very minor improvements. This bay reservoir hit several notes in performance due maintaining a nice spiral shaped volute, removing much of the exit elbow, and improving the inlet port to a more desirable size.

A special thanks to Paul from XSPC for providing the review sample:

XSPC-DualBayD5Res-01

Manufacturer Specifications:

http://www.xs-pc.com/products/pumps/d5-dual-bay-reservoirpump-combo/

– G1/4″ Threads
– Brushed Aluminium Faceplate
– Tough Nylon Body
– 1x 5mm LED hole
– Individually Pressure Tested
– Capacity 300ml
– Dimensions: 149 x 85.6 x 105mm

Supplied with black faceplate, 8 screws, and blue LED.